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Blog 3

By: JordanGlaze

Tutorial 6

In this week’s tutorial we moved onto talk about Accessibility techniques and we started off by defining what Web Accessibility is and came up with a few close suggestions before being shown the actual definition; Paul then moved onto separate it into 3 parts which ranged from Web sites to Web authoring tools which made it easier to understand the concept of Web Accessibility. From there we talked about how web accessibility could be as issue and interpreted that its use in overall daily life is now huge and not everyone will be able to use due to Website accessibility etc. Also Paul then shown us how Web Accessibility is becoming easier for the disabled through the use of: Visual, Hearing, Speech and Cognitive, these help a disabled user to use the system and allows them to also feel integrated in the web based social movement. After the theory based tutorial we moved onto action and began with an exercise that we the use of access keys and how they are used to navigate through pages by using the government standard AccessKeys EG: S = Skip Navigation, 1 = Home Page etc. From this we then moved onto the use of LANG and how by using this it will allow the user to change the language of the page to suit them, as if they were EG: Spanish they may not be able to read English so with a button to change language it allows them to use the website. Finally we then used META tags which are the search engine index by the use of Keywords and a description.

Tutorial 7

In this week’s tutorial we looked at the legal issues and security on the web. This topic is key to the web as it needs to be certified to keep everything safe and misconduct would need to be acted upon. We firstly looked at the copyright of a website and looked at why people copyright and how it works, and an example we looked at is YouTube and how they allow you to upload videos from their website onto your website as their copyright information allows for this to happen. Copyrighting your website will allow the owner to prevent copying, adaptations and public exposure. From this we moved onto a similar law in the Patent Law which is needed if an item doesn’t fall into the copyright law although generally they will fall under the copyright law some don’t and have to be patented.

In the second half we looked at web security and looked and started of by looking at social media and looked at how you can be more protective of your personal information EG: Strong Passwords etc. And then we looked at why people hack and there are a range of reasons from Bragging rights to finding out bank information. Further we looked at what to do and discussed that you should firstly check the anti-virus and then change all passwords to stop the hacker from striking again. Then paul went into more detail and stated that you should always turn off FTP and consider the switching of hosts if they can’t help your website to be safe.

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Top 5 Widely-Used Office Phone Systems

By: katiemorenna

Office phone system is a kind of business phone system that is used in businesses setting. An office telephonic system is connected to central unit that is responsible for handling calls and transferring it to desired extensions. Businesses use various types of office systems depending on the size and needs of an organization. Office telephonic system holds high importance in a professional environment as it bridges communication between the company, its employees and its customers.

There are currently 5 major types of office system for phones based on functionality and popularity. Here they are:

PBX

One of the oldest and most widely-used telephone systems that exist today, PBX offers range of features and options for big businesses and corporations. A PBX system is used for handling calls within one office space. With PBX, businesses can easily handle calls between different sections of organization.

VoIP

One of the most common forms of office telephone systems, VoIP uses internet protocol instead of landlines for handling calls. Unlike conventional landline systems, VoIP allows users to make and receive calls without needing to be on the same place. VoIP is popular among businesses as it is affordable and it offers features that enable users to make long calls at lower rates.

Key

Key phone system is ideal for businesses that run within 40 employees. Most of the calls are managed by centralized system which is responsible for transferring calls to concerned extension. This system is not apt for handling heavy loads of calls. Unlike PBX system, Key telephone system is economical. However, it comes with limited features which make it a less functional system than PBX.

KSU-Less Systems

KSU-Less systems is meant for small-scale businesses that run between 5-10 employees. KSU-Less System does not have any central control unit which means individual phones are used to make and receive calls. It is the most basic and cheapest type of office telephone system that does not require any installation costs. Most of the installation and customizations are performed by the employees themselves.

Hybrid

A hybrid office phone system is a combination of two or more systems that work as a single unit. These office phone systems have common features and run on special software to handle and transfer calls. Many companies sell hybrid system of Key and PBX that has features of both of these office phonic systems.

Trixbox Shop offers you budget-friendly phones just for your office which easily meet your business requirements and even adjust to future business growth and expansion.

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Blog 3

By: zraja

Lecture week 6/7                                                          

Dear readers, in this blog you won’t be reading about ethics, social media or web accessibility. This week’s blog will be about the system analysis and design!`

Main areas covered:

·         Waterfall Cycle

·         Prototype Cycle

In order to develop successful software you must follow the main instructions. Because of the waterfall cycle this is possible now, this cycle is a system that allows anyone to create a project. Because of the cycle you will be able to complete all tasks one at the time, in a specific order that will end as a completed project. In this project there will be many phases and in order to successful finish and complete this project you must make sure that the phases do not overlap!

 

Waterfall Life Cycle

Feasibility Study

This is the first phase. Here you will discuss whether the software is possible to create or not. By completing this phase you will have an understanding of how much goes into the project. The financial cost, will it work? And is it worth creating the software.4

System Analysis and Design

At this stage you will find out what data is required for the software. Also what equipment and hardware is needed for the software to run on.

Program and Unit Test

In this test the programme will be broken down into pieces. Because of this all the pieces could be tested to make sure there is no error. This will make sure that the program has no chance in failing.

System and Acceptance Test

This is where the entire program gets put together and tested to see if it still works. The project team has to make sure that all the modules work together with no failure. This is called the system test. Another test would be handed out called the acceptance test, this will check that the system works well for the business.

 

 

Operations

This is the finalization of the system. Ones the old system has been switched of and replaced with the new system errors will occur. These have to be fixed straight away. One’s a changed has been made it has to be tested straight away.

Prototype Cycle

After the waterfall cycle has been completed a new cycle will start which is called the prototype cycle. This cycle works basically the same as the waterfall cycle, however it has more test as it will find more slight errors. That will have to be fixed and tested. This is also known as the implementation. When all the decisions, plan have been executed the project will be finalized.

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System Implementation & Project Planning

By: Cerys

In my two previous posts I chose to focus on issues in the macro environment of information systems. Today, however, I would like to consider information systems more directly, in light of the topics discussed during week 8 and 9.

 

In the week 9 lecture we looked into the process of system implementation. The first stage in this process is the project planning stage. This is done with the intention for delivering the completed project in time and on budget. With having limited experience of the system implementation process, I found it difficult to imagine orchestrating what seems like a huge task with various aspects to juggle.

 

Some project management techniques were described to us, such as the Gantt chart and PERT (program evaluation and review technique) chart, and we applied them to the activity of booking a holiday. The Gantt chart particularly appealed to me because I generally have a visual learning style. I can see how the clear representation of activities over the entire timeline of the project helps you to identify which tasks are most time critical and how resources could be best utilised.

 

Gantt and PERT Charts. Visitask, (2014)

 

Interested by this, I wondered specifically how this could be used in implementing an information system. Through researching, I came across an article, which discusses the best way in which this activity could be managed, using Gantt and PERT in tandem with information system life cycle modelling (SLCM) approaches, such as Unified Modelling Language (UML) and Data Flow Diagrams (DFD) (Gelbard, Pliskin and Spiegler, 2002). UML diagrams attempt to represent a visualisation of the architecture of a system and DFD’s present the intended flow of information through a system.

 

 

Data Flow Diagram. Teach-ICT (2012)

Unified Modelling Language. Programming Languages Group (2007)

 

These would be used in the system analysis and design (SA&D) stage of both the waterfall lifecycle and prototype lifecycle.

 

The article explains that the most common practice (at the time) amongst software engineering companies tended to be that most would use dedicated project management tools such as MS Project, and separately will utilise Computer Aided Software Engineering (CASE) tools, such as Rational, to automate various SLCM approaches. It is suggested that this disjoining is troubling because the valuable information that is initially collected in early stage SA&D through UML, DRDs etc. is often later overlooked altogether or collected again by project managers.

IBM Rational, (Siberlogic, 2010)

 

MS Project, (Jacs3d, 2014)

 

The reason the authors give for the integration of project management and SLCM approaches, is that it can “shorten project duration, contribute to efficient use of resources, and help estimate the required development effort and cost as well as the expected system performance, complexity, and quality.”

In other aspects of my life I have often found that an activity I had been trying to organise had either overrun or I’d spent more than I initially budgeted for, I can see that these issues are of dire importance to businesses. I find it quite easy to imagine that when there is a large team working on a vast project that SA&D becomes poorly project managed. Even Apple’s IOS8 improvements for their map application failed to meet the deadline as a result of poor project management (Lunden, 2015). It’s interesting to ponder where the management failed.

 

If you’re interested in finding out about the recommendations made by Gelbard, Pliskin and Spiegler, the full text is available on the Science Direct website. I do advise reading it because I feel it discuss go in depth but easy enough to understand for non-specialists!

 

Hopefully with this in mind, we can all be better equipped for implementing our first information system.

Fail to prepare, then prepare to fail!

 

References

 

Gelbard, R., Pliskin, N. and Spiegler, I. (2002). Integrating system analysis and project management tools. International Journal of Project Management, 20(6), pp.461-468, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0263-7863(01)00044-8.

Jacs3d, (2014), Microsoft Project [ONLINE]. Available at: http://jacs3d.com/pruebas/curso2/managers/course/images/241315191.Microsoft.jpg [Accessed 23 April 15].

Lunden, I. (2015). Apple’s Maps Are Still Lost. [online] TechCrunch. Available at: http://techcrunch.com/2014/06/08/apple-maps-are-still-lost/ [Accessed 23 Apr. 2015].

Programming Languages Group, (2007), Simple UML Diagram [ONLINE]. Available at: http://www.cs.uwaterloo.ca/~migod/uml/omniGraffle.jpg [Accessed 23 April 15].

Siberlogic, (2010), IBM Rational [ONLINE]. Available at: http://www.siberlogic.com/export/sites/default/images/partners/ibm_rational.gif [Accessed 23 April 15].

Teach-ICT, (2012), Data Flow Diagram [ONLINE]. Available at: http://www.teach-ict.com/as_a2_ict_new/ocr/A2_G063/331_systems_cycle/analysis_tools/miniweb/pg10.htm [Accessed 23 April 15].

Visitask, (2014), Sample PERT and Gantt Chart [ONLINE]. Available at: http://www.visitask.com/img/sample-gantt-chart.jpg [Accessed 23 April 15].

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Project Viability and Planning for Success

By: martingriffiths

Project Viability and Planning for Success

Hello everyone and thanks for checking in on my third blog. Last time we were looking at the process of researching and gathering the information required to successfully plan and develop a software program using what’s known as the prototype method.

From reading my last blog you may be aware that I am developing my own software package which I intend to offer to businesses in the fast food market. This idea has been constructed into a business plan which was entered on behalf of The University of Salford into the Santander Entrepreneurship Awards 2015. This was after successfully pitching the concept and business model to lecturers of the business school and its partners.

Shortly after this, I was invited to present my recent accomplishment with my fellow students during the systems and development lecture the week after. During the presentation I was able to introduce what prompted us as a team to come up with the idea by looking and presenting some of the research data obtained during our requirement analysis and feasibility studies. During this stage we communicated with business owners to find out what systems they currently use and how these could be improved. We also observed staff using the system and gathered feedback on what issues they felt could improve the current system. This was compared with other products on the market and it was apparent that small businesses were unable to get the features found in the custom built programs that are developed for large multi-internationals.

During a group project in the lecture, we looked at a case study that involved a General Hospital based in the USA. In this we can see examples of how to ensure the software will meet the objectives of the management. This includes meeting with stakeholders, which I will assume is to determine the costing of the system, management to ensure the right features are implemented and staff who will ultimately be the end users of this program. McMurtrey,M (2013). It is important to take notes from all parties to ensure the technical sides can be met, along with the economic viability and ethics of the project.

Through our own research we formed the foundations for our systems analysis and design. Using the research and feedback we were able to come up with the technical specifications and features that fast food outlets would require in an ordering system, with functions to help with the organisation of the day to day running of the business.

Once the basic functions were outlined we were able to begin programming the software and testing its functionality. One of the key issues gathered from the feedback was the design of many of these systems. The user experience seen in current systems was found to be difficult and timely for staff to complete forms and correct errors. Using the prototype method we were presented with a chance to design a number of layout options before deciding on the best fit for our consumers based on their feedback.

 

EPOS Pizza Screen

(Image detailing our proposed layout for the ordering screen)

 

The following week I was reintroduced to Gantt charts, which are a type of project management tool used to plan phases of a development against a progressing timescale. These allow project managers such as myself to monitor the progress of the development during each stage and ensure that a project will be completed on time.

I believe this would be the best method for monitoring the project and intend to make one that includes details of the features that will be included throughout the software and track the completion and testing of each module. Systems like this will ensure our project developers have the appropriate goals and realistic targets to work towards an eventual completion date of their allocated tasks.  

The video below shows how you can create a basic Gantt chart for your own projects in Microsoft Excel. This video was made by Eugene O'Loughlin who is a lecturer at the National College of Ireland.

 

References

McMurtrey,M (2013) A case study of the application of the systems development lifecycle in 21st century health care. Journal of the Southern Association for Information Systems. Vol 1 (1)

 

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Blog 3 - Week 8 & 9

Blog 3 - Week 8 & 9

By: gustavoreguero

Week 8

The topic of our eighth week was Systems Analysis and Design. And we understood that, to develop a system, it is need that the developer perform the following stages:

Research

Gather information about the present system

Analysis

Analyse how the present system works and identify the problems

Design

 

Think about a new system that will fix those problems

Production

Create the new system from the design

Testing

Test if the new system works as predicted

Documentation

Documents describing how to use the system and how it works

Implementation

Replace the present with the new system

Evaluation

Check if the new system meets the expectations


These stages are just an overall process of a system development. Later on the lecture we discussed the two main models to develop a system, the Waterfall Cycle and Prototype Cycle. As I already posted on my last blog, the Waterfall Cycle is sequential and the Prototype cycle is iterative. Link to my last blog about these models.

You may want to read more about System Analysis and Design on the BCA Notes website

Week 9

The addressed topic on week 9 was Systems Implementation, in other words, the execution of model, design, plan or realization of an application. The implementation of an information system consists Project Planning, which some of the main objectives is to deliver the project on time, within budget and acceptable quality, and the manager of the project must monitor its progress.
Some project planning activities, involves PERT (Programme Evaluation and Review Technique), which according to NetMBA (2010), PERT “is a network model that allows for randomness in activity completion times… It has the potential to reduce both the time and cost required to complete a project”. It is used to identify priorities and the minimum time necessary to complete the project. See Figure 1 for an example.

Another charting activity is the Gantt chart, which allow us to see what the activity is and the allocation of resources to it, track the progress, where the activities overlap with others and the start and end date of the project. See Figure 2 for an example. It also can be utilised to assign an activity for each member of the team.

Programming is the next stage of the Implementation process. And that includes programming languages such as C+ and codes such as Java.

Testing consists on checking if the system works and if the results meet the expectations. A very common model of testing is the V Model, see Figure 3 for an example.  This model requires that each completed stage, there must be a testing phase. And that the next phase starts only after the completion of the previous one.

Implementation takes place when the project has already been planned, programmed and tested. Before the new system goes live, it is essential that the users are trained, appropriate devices are available and data capture and data cutover must be done.
There are three main methods to approach:

·         Major switch over: turn off old system and install new system during a weekend for example.

·         Staged roll-out: implement the new system in one location at a time

·         Parallel running: run the old system and the new system in parallel until the new system has been proved.

Maintenance occurs when the system is implemented. Queries are forwarded to help desks, which has three levels of support

·         First-level support: simple queries

·         Second-level support: problems with the IS, bug fixes

·         Third-level support: technical issues with system software and the IT installation.

Thank you for reading.


Figure 1

http://www.netmba.com/images/operations/project/pert/pert.gif

Figure 2

http://best-excel-tutorial.com/images/Excel%20Gantt%20Chart.jpg

 

Figure 3

SDLC V-Model

 

 

 

 

 

Reference List

·         NetMBA (2010) PERT. Available from http://www.netmba.com/operations/project/pert/.  [Accessed: 23rd April 2015];

·         TutorialsPoint (2015) SDLC – V-Model. Available from http://www.tutorialspoint.com/sdlc/sdlc_v_model.htm. [Accessed: 23rd April 2015].

 

Figure List

·         Figure 1 - NetMBA (2010) PERT. Available from http://www.netmba.com/operations/project/pert/.  [Accessed: 23rd April 2015];

·         Figure 2 – Best Excel Tutorial (2014) Gantt Chart. Available from http://best-excel-tutorial.com/56-charts/116-gantt-chart. [Accessed: 23rd April 2015].

·         Figure 3 - TutorialsPoint (2015) SDLC – V-Model. Available from http://www.tutorialspoint.com/sdlc/sdlc_v_model.htm. [Accessed: 23rd April 2015].

 

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Blog 3 - Week 8 and 9

By: BTB535

Hi there, I would like to thank you for choosing to read my blog, in this weeks blog i will be talking about what I have learned in weeks 8 and 9 in Principles of Systems Development. 

In week 8 we focussed on System Analysis Design, the aim of this was for us to understand the analysis and design of an information system and also, understand the relationships of an information system. Firstly looking into the key system elements, in order for the developers to write a program or develop an information system they must know what is needed from the program or system, then how to design this. There are many stages in systems development, as you may recall to the last blog we had looked into two stages which were the waterfall cycle and prototype cycle. I liked the waterfall cycle when I got to read more into this as I feel this is something a business will need when changing to another system. Below I have gone into a little more depth on the Waterfall cycle. 

The first stage of the waterfall cycle will look at Feasibility Study this will ask 3 questions:

  • Will it work
  • Is it affordable 
  • Should it be done

In the report for this stage it will include the proposed outline of the project, a summary involving the equipment and software needed, the plan of the project and a cost benefit analysis. By undertaking these you will gain the 3 answers to the 3 bullet points above. After this we move onto the next stage which is the system analysis and design this will include:

  • Requirement analysis
  • Logical Design 
  • Physical Design 

After this stage we move on to stage 3 which is the programme and unit test, which is when each programme is written it is tested to check if it will work smoothly or if any alterations are needed. From this we will move on to the systems and acceptance test. This is where the system will be tested under live conditions with many users and handling the amount of data needed. Finally we move onto the operations stage which is implementation, this is moving onto the new system and out with the old. Within operations there will be maintenance which will carry on over the use of the system. 

In week 9 we looked at systems implementation. The key elements to Systems Implementation are:

  • Project Planning
  • Programming
  • Testing
  • Implementation
  • Maintenance 

From there we have looked at Charting Activities and came across PERT. This is a method which is used to chart project activitites. PERT stands for: 

  • Programme 
  • Evaluation
  • Review
  • Technique

We also looked at Gant Chart which is used to show the project plan. This can be constructed from the PERT chart and can help with showing the allocation of resources which are needed in each activity, and also help tracking the progress of the project against the plan. 

After reading into Gant charts we moved onto Testing which is running through the software to see if it works. There are many different methods within testing which are: 

  • Module 
  • Link
  • System
  • Acceptance

Testing software can take time, but it is done thoroughly so the team know whether it is working to full potential, however this does not mean that the software is correct, this will be found out when problems occur and maintenance is needed. 

Thank you for taking the time out to read my blog.

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Planning  Can it really help avoid disasters?

Planning Can it really help avoid disasters?

By: Zahid Tapas

Planning – Can it really help avoid disasters?

In my previous blogs I have been talking a lot about web ethics and security, so today I have decided to change the focus of my blog, instead of scaring you I am hoping to inform and advise you on planning and how it can help you and your organisation.

What is planning? - Planning is one of the most important project management and time management techniques. Planning is preparing a sequence of action steps to achieve a specific goal. (Time management guide, 2015)

In week 9 the lecture was about system implementation which consisted of a number of different things such as planning, testing and of course implementation. However what caught my attention was the aspect of planning. We as humans plan things every day, what clothes to wear tomorrow or what chores need to be completed the next day. Except the planning I learnt about in the lecture were different, they were detailed and coherent and could potentially save us as people from a disaster! I’m not afraid to admit that I personally though that planning was an unnecessary step that all businesses took during the cycle of them implementing their Information System But luckily for you guys you will never underestimate the power of planning again because like I did because you have clicked onto my blog.

There are two planning methods which are the most popular within the business world, Gantt charts and PERT charts. Both are detailed, coherent and effective however I personally prefer Gantt charts because they look professional yet are very easy to follow as opposed to a PERT chart. When creating a Gantt chart, the individual who is in charge of leading the project needs to think through all of the tasks that need to be completed within the project. As part of this process, they will delegate tasks to each member involved in the project, how long each task will take, and what problems the team may encounter. This detailed thinking that goes into the Gantt chart helps you ensure that the schedule is efficient, the right people are appointed to complete a task, and that you have solutions for potential problems that may arise. (Mind Tools, 2015)

According to Project Smart, charts should be seen as snapshots of the current project situation. They should be dynamic and change as circumstances change, particularly as work is carried out on the tasks. This is why I love Gantt charts, they are easy to follow and update mind you they should always be updated otherwise disaster will strike.

Finally, why would a project be a disaster without sufficient planning? Would you run a marathon without training? Would you drive a car without maintaining it? No? Then why start a project without planning it. Use The correct tools, use the most efficient tools, use a Gantt chart.

 

Also check out this amazing article as to why a Gantt chart is the perfect planning tool.

http://www.projectsmart.co.uk/how-gantt-charts-can-help-avoid-disaster.php

 

Bibliography.

  1. Mindtools.com,. 'Gantt Charts: Planning And Scheduling More Complex Projects'. N.p., 2015. Web. 23 Apr. 2015.

        2. Time-management-guide.com,. 'What Is Planning And Why You Need To Plan'. N.p., 2015. Web. 23 Apr. 2015.

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Blog 3 - Week 8 & 9

By: gustavoreguero

Week 8

The topic of our eighth week was Systems Analysis and Design. And we understood that, to develop a system, it is need that the developer perform the following stages:

Research

Gather information about the present system

Analysis

Analyse how the present system works and identify the problems

Design

 

Think about a new system that will fix those problems

Production

Create the new system from the design

Testing

Test if the new system works as predicted

Documentation

Documents describing how to use the system and how it works

Implementation

Replace the present with the new system

Evaluation

Check if the new system meets the expectations


These stages are just an overall process of a system development. Later on the lecture we discussed the two main models to develop a system, the Waterfall Cycle and Prototype Cycle. As I already posted on my last blog, the Waterfall Cycle is sequential and the Prototype cycle is iterative. Link to my last blog about these models.

You may want to read more about System Analysis and Design on the BCA Notes website

Week 9

The addressed topic on week 9 was Systems Implementation, in other words, the execution of model, design, plan or realization of an application. The implementation of an information system consists Project Planning, which some of the main objectives is to deliver the project on time, within budget and acceptable quality, and the manager of the project must monitor its progress.
Some project planning activities, involves PERT (Programme Evaluation and Review Technique), which according to NetMBA (2010), PERT “is a network model that allows for randomness in activity completion times… It has the potential to reduce both the time and cost required to complete a project”. It is used to identify priorities and the minimum time necessary to complete the project. See Figure 1 for an example.

Another charting activity is the Gantt chart, which allow us to see what the activity is and the allocation of resources to it, track the progress, where the activities overlap with others and the start and end date of the project. See Figure 2 for an example. It also can be utilised to assign an activity for each member of the team.

Programming is the next stage of the Implementation process. And that includes programming languages such as C+ and codes such as Java.

Testing consists on checking if the system works and if the results meet the expectations. A very common model of testing is the V Model, see Figure 3 for an example.  This model requires that each completed stage, there must be a testing phase. And that the next phase starts only after the completion of the previous one.

Implementation takes place when the project has already been planned, programmed and tested. Before the new system goes live, it is essential that the users are trained, appropriate devices are available and data capture and data cutover must be done.
There are three main methods to approach:

·         Major switch over: turn off old system and install new system during a weekend for example.

·         Staged roll-out: implement the new system in one location at a time

·         Parallel running: run the old system and the new system in parallel until the new system has been proved.

Maintenance occurs when the system is implemented. Queries are forwarded to help desks, which has three levels of support

·         First-level support: simple queries

·         Second-level support: problems with the IS, bug fixes

·         Third-level support: technical issues with system software and the IT installation.

Thank you for reading.


Figure 1

http://www.netmba.com/images/operations/project/pert/pert.gif

Figure 2

http://best-excel-tutorial.com/images/Excel%20Gantt%20Chart.jpg

 

Figure 3

SDLC V-Model

 

 

 

 

 

Reference List

·         NetMBA (2010) PERT. Available from http://www.netmba.com/operations/project/pert/.  [Accessed: 23rd April 2015];

·         TutorialsPoint (2015) SDLC – V-Model. Available from http://www.tutorialspoint.com/sdlc/sdlc_v_model.htm. [Accessed: 23rd April 2015].

 

Figure List

·         Figure 1 - NetMBA (2010) PERT. Available from http://www.netmba.com/operations/project/pert/.  [Accessed: 23rd April 2015];

·         Figure 2 – Best Excel Tutorial (2014) Gantt Chart. Available from http://best-excel-tutorial.com/56-charts/116-gantt-chart. [Accessed: 23rd April 2015].

·         Figure 3 - TutorialsPoint (2015) SDLC – V-Model. Available from http://www.tutorialspoint.com/sdlc/sdlc_v_model.htm. [Accessed: 23rd April 2015].

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Assessment 1 - Blog 3

By: Emma

Welcome!

It’s been a while since I last posted a blog post due to the Easter break. Hope everyone has enjoyed themselves. This blog is going to be discussing the topics which were covered in my lectures and seminars during weeks 8 & 9.

Week 8 lecture.

During the lecture which took in place during week 8 we discussed systems analysis and design.

As discussed in a previous blog from week 6 & 7 it states that we had a brief introduction to the waterfall model and the prototype lifecycle well during week 8 we looked at these models in more depth, firstly we look at the waterfall model which is broken down into a sequence of 5 stages

1.       Feasibility study

2.       System analysis and design

3.       Program and unit test

4.       System and acceptance test

5.       Operations

Each of the above stages requires completion and to be signed off before the next stage begins.

Each of the stages was then broken down and explained in a lot more detail such as what is involved with each stage for example, the feasibility study seeks to answer three questions:

  • Is the system technically feasible – will it work?
  • Is the system financially justified – can we afford it?
  • Is the system ethically acceptable – should we do it?

After this model had been discussed we then moved on and did the same for the prototype model, this model is broken down into 7 stages,

1.       Feasibility Study

2.       Prototype:

3.       Initial Prototype

4.       Test and discuss Prototype

5.       Enhance Prototype

6.       System and Acceptance Test

7.       Operations

During the end of this lecture we were asked to read through a business’ proposal for a new system for a client. Once we had completed the reading we were then asked to chose either of the models and see if the business would be able to afford this model or not.

Week 8 Seminar

The seminar which took place in week 8 was mainly a recap of all the major elements which are needed to create the website which I am currently working on for my Assessment 2 in this module, once we had recapped the previous elements which had been taught we then had time to either spend time working on the website we were creating or time for some students to start their own if they hadn’t already done so. This was a very useful way to spend my time as it gave me the opportunity to approach the seminar tutors about any issues I have come across before having the Easter break to extend my website.

 

Week 9 Lecture

The material used in the week 9 lecture covered the different stages and types of implementation. This is where we learnt that the implementation consists of 5 main stages.

1.       Project planning

2.       Production or procurement of software (programming)

3.       Testing within the project team and with the users

4.       Implementation (go-live)

5.       Maintenance of the system

 

We also learnt about 2 of the main project management tools which are PERT charts and Gantt charts. We were shown examples of both these charts and given an in-depth explanation as to how they are used. After this a group task was put into place to create either one of these charts which we would use when planning a holiday. Each group had to take into consideration about timeframes for each of the activities which need to take place when planning a holiday.

 

Week 9 Seminar

The seminar which took place in week 9 gave us more knowledge about the functions and uses of CSS & HTML. We were then given a URL to visit to see examples of what can be done using CSS3 which was interesting to see and look into during my free time. Towards the end of this seminar we had another opportunity to spend some time working on the website for Assessment 2.

 

If you are interested in website development take a look at www.w3schools.com even with no prior knowledge this website will aid you in building your own. 

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Software systems how they work, how they are made.

By: Katie Louise

What are Waterfall Cycles ? What do they have to do with Software Systems? So this weeks entry is going to be focussed on two sides of one subject, the subject being Large software systems and one of the most reliable ways to implement them. First up to discuss is a process called The "Waterfall Cycle" this is actually just a terminology which is used by the Management and Development side of large software systems, where the process is continuously broken down into stages, after numerous adaptations the stages are expanded so they are more successful for the final outcome, which in effect continuously widens like a waterfall. The second section of this topic of is the actual implementation of this process, details on the stages used and why some of the original stages will have been removed or adapted and why some trials failed. 

 

When it comes to software systems it is crucial that they work sufficiently and ideally how you imagined them in your head, like everything you have your limitations but the key to these kinds of trials is finding exactly what fits together, to in effect reach that dreamed about goal. So first things first is a plan, list all the sections that need to create the actual basis of a software system, obviously over time this will have to grow as we are working with a larger protocol and the bigger it gets all the more room for details right? So with layers comes strength this is called "Agile Development" this is how the process is strengthened so it has much less overall weaknesses and in turn is less likely to fail. According to (DR Winston.W Royce) all of the trials that he has been involved in which have stayed with the minimal 5 stages used in the final system with no added improvements have not been successful, this has proven a waste of investment. Although regular adaptations cause more upfront costs in the long run with a higher percentage of reliability, the cost will certainly be less overall. 

 

According to my research (Advantages and Disadvantages) the waterfall cycle is classed as easy root to take, it's important to remember that it really is a one step at a time process and that each step needs to be completed before another can be started, so if you know what your stages are surely this can be pulled off quite easily right? Actually this isn't always the case, once these stages reach testing it is very difficult to make any changes, so it may appear as not too difficult to develop but after breaking it down in seriously in depth detail  every section matters, so yes this procedure is no joke!  The initial steps usually start with 5 which include; Requirements, Design, Implementation, Verification and maintenance, this example isn't the exact stages for every set up but does give you the basic premise to set up your system and adapt it to however you deem fit. 

 

To summarise I now have an understanding  of what a Waterfall cycle is and why they are used, whilst discovering that software systems need to work off of a fixed process and a successful step by step plan, its  harder the larger the system and like everything these processes have advantages and disadvantages, I can certainly see why these stages need to expand. To actually achieve you would need a decent budget and excessive funding for unforseen fixtures that need to be made also never underestimate the amount of thought that needs to go into the development. Basically ivisage what you want at the end of the process, set reasonable goals, achieve the necessary steps and prepare for possible failings as in a redundancy plan.  

 

 

 

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Blog Number 3

By: HugoChang

Week 8-9 Blog


 

For the lecture during week 8, the two main Systems Life Cycles were discussed. During the process of creating a system for a customer, these two main Systems Life Cycles have to be considered, and they are the Waterfall Life Cycle and the Prototype Life Cycle.

 

The Waterfall Life Cycle consists of 5 stages, including a Feasibility Study, which is used to measure the risks of continuing with a new project, and to conduct studies as to whereas the product would be financially profitable. The second stage is System Analysis and Design, and this is used to be the benchmark for the expected capabilities of the system as defined by the client. Usually during this stage the requirement specification is created. The third stage is then the Programme and Unit testing, and this ensures that all the programming and coding are working perfectly. Testing is done in detail throughout the entire system, making sure every function and feature are working to their maximum potential, with no loopholes or bugs. After this, the system is sent to a project team which check that it meets the requirements specified by the client.

 

When the system is finally approved to go, there are two methods in which it can be implemented. The first method involves the immediate implementation, which replaces the entire old system directly, while the second one is a phased implementation, where the parts of a new system are implemented one by one(this is where parts of a new system “are implemented one by one” (DeskTopClass, 2015), so users can get used to the new features. I personally believe that phased implementation is a better method, because it provides flexibility.

 

The main difference in the waterfall and prototype is that for the prototype method, programmers will create multiple prototypes and go back to it all the time in order to revise and improve the system. I personally believe that the prototype life cycle is a more effective cycle, as it eliminates a lot of bugs that a system might have, and it allows easy fixes.

 

The seminar involved some more learning of CSS, such as customisation of the height and width of boxes or images or videos, and customise fonts. We were also asked to look at a website that we should remake to improve it for the practical section of our assessment.


 

During the lectures in week 9, we covered the implementation process, and this involves 5 stages as well - project planning, which helps the business ensure that the business will be delivered, testing, which again tests the system for any flaws, then there is the actual implementation, and then maintenance of the system.

 

For the seminar, we continued on the work from last week, and I learnt a bit more about the specific styles that I wanted to use in my improvements for my webpage.

References

·      OpenPro. (2014). OPENPRO SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT LIFE CYCLE. Retrieved 22 April, 2015, fromhttp://www.openpro.com/services_sdlc.html

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Blog week 8&9

By: martinashtereva

Hey there, guys! This week my blog is going to be about the lectures and tutorials from week 8 and 9 from the Principles of Systems Development course I’m studying at University of Salford. Before the Eastern break during week 8 we covered the Systems Analysis and Design theme. The main thing we talked about was the two types of systems development cycles which we covered briefly in the previous lecture – the Waterfall and the Prototype. The one I’m going to look in a little bit more details is the Waterfall Cycle. It is the basic one and breaks down into five stages which are as follows: Feasibility Study, System Analysis and Design, Program and Unit Test, System and Acceptance Test and Operations. The Feasibility has to answer three main questions about the system: is it technically feasible, financially justified and ethically acceptable. Stage two brakes into two parts and the first one is the Requirements Analysis which aims to find out what the users do and how that can be improved. The second part also breaks into two different parts called the Logical Design and Physical/Technical Design. The Logical Design focuses on the user design whereas the other one focuses mainly on the use of technology and organisational structures. On the third stage the system is implemented on the IT equipment. On stage four tests are run to see if the complete system is working. On the last fifth stage the system must go through full and phased implementation and once it is live it must be maintained.

The eighth week tutorial was a practise review of the evolution of HTML and CSS. We discussed the element tags, the basic document structure as well as the doctype and charset. We also talked about the CSS selectors as well as the font styles and list styles. At the end of the tutorial we discussed the Box model which is an invisible box used to surround each element.

The ninth week lecture was about the five stages of systems implementation: Project Planning, Programming, Testing, Implementation and Maintenance. What I’m going to focus on is the two charting activities called PERT and GANTT. PERT is one of the methods used to chart project activities. It stands for Programme Evaluation and Review Technique and it charts each activity in relation to other activities. PERT is used to identify critical paths and minimum elapse time. The second method is called Gantt and is used to represent the project plan. It can be used to show allocation of resources to each activity, track progress as well as to plan the activity of each member of the team.

In the ninth week tutorial we talked about the fonts on the web and that not all systems have different fonts so we use font families in CSS. Examples of font families are Times New Roman, Serif, Georgia. We also learned how to make CSS rounded corners.

 

If you found the theme of this blog intriguing here I sorted out a few pages I find interesting for further reading:

The difference between the Waterfall and Prototype:  http://www.buzzle.com/articles/difference-between-prototype-model-and-waterfall-model.html

The Waterfall Cycle in detail: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waterfall_model

Difference between PERT and GANTT:  http://www.differencebetween.info/difference-between-gantt-and-pert-chart

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Week 8 & 9

By: ryanjb19951

Week 8
In the week 8 lectures we looked over the Waterfall and the Prototype Cycle again.  The waterfall cycle is a basic systems development lifecycle and works effectively. This basically breaks the full sequence of study into a few different headings; Feasibility Study, System Analysis and Design, Program and Unit test, System and Acceptance test and Operations. Each of these stages is required to be completed and ticked off to go onto the next one. We spoke in depth about what each of the sections contain and what that person would have to do in that section to move on. It is a really good system that works effectively. I prefer how it is broken down into steps instead of just one big review. It makes the whole project easier and more sufficient.

This week was a good week when it came down to learning new information. We looked over one of my favourite topics this year, HTML. We learned about the Vocabulary of Mark Up and what they are used for within the code. We learned about the Opening and Closing Tags, the HTML elements, Attributes and the Values. These are what make HTML when coding your website. Without these, the website wouldn’t have a structure. What most interested me also was learning more about the different styles of font in CSS. It shouldn’t be basic, and when the different styles come in it makes the webpage look a lot nicer. Without CSS the web page wouldn’t look very good, it would literally be just text with maybe some padding.

Week 9
This week was an interesting week; in the lecture we went over again what we spoke about in the previous week but in more depth. The main title for this lecture was Systems Implementation. We went into talking about PERT. This is a method used to chart certain project activities. This stands for Programme, Evaluation and Review Technique. This is a good acronym, we learnt that this method is used to seek, Critical Paths and Minimum Time laps within. We also went through the different types of charts as well that keep your work and mind at ease. We use these to keep on top of ourselves and make sure we don’t fall behind. We have a schedule and we must stick to it.  

Leading on from the Lecture, in the Tutorial we learnt about Prototype Surgery. This class was basically explaining more in depth CSS and how fantastic it looks when used in a website correctly. We spoke about something we haven’t really gone through yet and that was, rounded corners. They make the buttons and décor in the website look a lot more professional, instead of a normal box or rectangle. We looked at a few changes we could make to our websites. Just little things like Navigation Bar, sliding panels and even better looking logos. I took the information from the Lectures and Tutorials and put the work into practise, with my website coming along now.

 

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Blog Post 3

By: SeanHarrison

Hi everyone, thanks for taking the time to read this blog.

In week eight’s lecture we learned in more detail about the two essential variants of SDLCs that that we discussed the previous week: the waterfall cycle and the prototyping cycle. To open the lecture we were set a task in small groups to read a case study about a hospital introducing a new SDLC system (McMurtrey, 2013) and then decide whether the waterfall or the prototyping cycle was best suited to the situation. After analysing the benefits and drawbacks of both methods, my group came to the conclusion that the prototyping method would be best for this particular scenario. This is because the information held within a hospital is so important and, ultimately, people’s lives are at stake therefore it is vital that the new system is tested thoroughly to ensure that it’s working perfectly before it is implemented. If the waterfall method is used and a mistake is made during the design stage, the whole system would be wrong and it would be too late to make any amends to it. We then went through the different stages of the waterfall cycle such as the feasibility study and the programme and unit test and the stages of the prototyping method such as creating the initial prototype and then testing and enhancing that prototype. To conclude the lecture we re-capped on the advantages and disadvantages of both of the variants.

If you would like some tips on how to design an effective waterfall cycle, please feel free to view this paper: http://www.serena.com/docs/agile/papers/Managing-The-Development-of-Large-Software-Systems.pdf (Royce, 1970).

 

In week nine’s lecture we learned about systems implementation and the stages during this process. Firstly, we discussed project planning, its objectives (for example, to be delivered on time) and that a project manager must monitor progress against the plan. We then learned about the PERT and GANTT methods that can be used to chart project activities and was then set a task in our small groups to apply one of the methods to the scenario of planning a holiday. My group chose the scenario of going to Paris and chose to use the GANTT method. Some of the activities we included was: finding and booking the cheapest flight and hotel, going on a tour of the city and visiting the Eiffel tower. I found that the GANTT method would be useful in most situations, not just planning a system or a holiday, as it gives both an easy and clear structure to proceedings. We then touched on testing and its different methods such as system or acceptance testing and then discussed implementation and the various ways it can be carried out. I think the best method of implementation is parallel running as, although it doubles the workload, it ensures a new system is working perfectly before an old system is gotten rid of. To conclude the lecture we briefly mentioned maintenance and was taught about first, second and third level support.

Thanks again for reading. Please look out for my next blog.

 

References

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My 3rd Blog about week 8 and week 9.

By: Yaqoob Alkaabi

Welcome to my 3rd blog.

I will discuss what we have been learning in week eight and nine, the aim of week 8 was to learn and discuss the Systems Analysis and Design, as well as that I have been taught about the relationships of an information system to the wider business context in which it is deployed.

 

We have also looked at lifecycles such as the Waterfall which is sequential and the prototyping lifecycle which is Iterative. In week 9 we have developed our knowledge about system implementation.

Week 8

Over the past weeks I have been developing my knowledge of system analysis and design. When a developer wants to write a program or develop an information system, the first thing that they will need to do is finding out what is needed and how the design should be implemented. This could be done by interviewing the client because as a system developer you will have to make sure that all the requirements are met and without having the requirements, as a developer it will be impossible to develop a system.  

“The systems development life cycle (SDLC) is a conceptual model used in project management that describes the stages involved in an information system development project, from an initial feasibility study through maintenance of the completed application”. (TechTarget, 2015)

We have learnt about the two stages which are the waterfall cycle and the prototype cycle.  The waterfall cycle breaks the project down into a sequence of stages, these are:

1-      Feasibility study, this study would help to evaluate the whole system, for example estimated cost of developing a system.  

2-      System analysis and design, system analyse it’s an overview of what the system can do and a specifications of IT equipment and technical procedures. The design stage focuses on efficient use of technology and organisational structure. 

3-      Program and unit test, the developer will have to write a set of instructions in a programming language. The testing stage are divided into two stages, the first test is a system test helps to find out if the new developed system works. The second test is acceptance test, this test is done by the user to check if all the original requirements are.

4-      Operations, firstly the system must go live and it requires installation of new IT and network equipment, training of maintenance and support staff.

As groups we were asked to think about the advantages and the disadvantages of waterfall cycle. The advantages of waterfall cycle is that it’s a simple, logical sequence of stages and facilitates clear cut project management. The disadvantages of the waterfall cycle that we come out with is that waterfall methods tend to be long-winded and expensive.

Furthermore, during our lecture we have been taught about the second method which is the Prototype lifecycle that consist of a feasibility study, initial prototype, test prototype, system test and operations. We were asked as groups about the advantages and the disadvantages of the prototype lifecycle, the advantages such as, it’s a good way of working out the user requirements and the user gets involved throughout the project process.

 On the other hand, prototype lifecycles benefit both the developer and the client because the developer can always make changes but a disadvantage on the developer’s side is it’s time consuming. I think the lecture was very interesting because I have learnt about the two methods which were new to me and I now know the advantages and the challenges of using the both methods.

During our seminar in week eight, we have been learning about validation and how it can help us to check our webpages against the web standards. The rest of our seminar we were told to continue with our work on our holding page which I had started a week before. I have learnt how to add a header, main body and a footer to my holding page. Furthermore, I have created my contact page and called it contact.htm. The seminar was very helpful for me because I have developed my knowledge of the functions and uses of HTML and CSS.

 Week 9

During the lecture in week 9, I have been learning and developing my knowledge about system implementation.  Systems implementation “is the construction of the new system and the delivery of that system into production (that is, the day-to-day business or organization operation)”. (Simmons, 2015).  

In the week 9 lecture, I understood the analysis and design of an information system, as well as that I understood the relationships of an information system to the wider business context in which it is deployed.

I learnt about the different stages such as the project planning stage which helps to insure that the project is on time, within the budget and to an acceptable quality. Also, the other stages such as, programing, testing, implementation and maintenance.

Within the lecture, I was introduced to a new method which is PERT, this is a method which can be used to chart project activities. I have been taught about the uses of PERT method, one of the uses is that it helps to identify critical paths and minimum elapse time.  

 

“A Gantt chart is one of the most popular and useful ways of showing activities (tasks or events) displayed against time”. (Gantt.com, 2015)  

 

As groups we were asked to create a Gantt chart containing the different stages that are involved in planning a holiday. My group and I came-up with a holiday plan to Barcelona, our Gantt chart consists of all the stages from booking flight and searching for a hotel to checking out at the airport.

 

Moving on to the seminar in week 9, I developed my knowledge about CSS rounded corners and how is it useful for buttons and panels, I also looked at different examples of CSS rounded corners. In addition, I learnt about CSS3 techniques and looked at example of that on http://goo.gl/lnfn3v, these techniques were useful for my website. For the rest of the seminar I tested may website which I have made during the Easter break, the testing was on a different monitor size and I had to use percentages rather than pixels in my webpages so that my webpages are scalable.

 

I think the seminar was very useful because I managed to test my webpages on different monitors and I have learnt new CSS techniques.  

Reference list

·         TechTarget. (2015) systems development life cycle (SDLC).Retrieved on 22 April, 2015, from http://searchsoftwarequality.techtarget.com/definition/systems-development-life-cycle

 

·         Simmons.edu. (2015) system implementation. Retrieved on 22 April, 2015, from http://web.simmons.edu/~benoit/lis486/SystemsImplementation.html

 

·         Gantt.com (2015) what is a Gantt chart. Retrieved on 22 April, 2015, from

 http://www.gantt.com/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Blog 3 - Weeks 8 & 9

By: soniahamied

Hey everyone!

Hope you all enjoyed your Easter vacation! It’s been quite a while since I last posted a blog and I am hoping this blog is one you will find interesting.

Within this blog I am have mentioned what I have learnt during the principles of systems development lectures which had taken place in week 8 and 9. I also looked back on what we had learnt in weeks 6 and 7 which consisted of the ‘Waterfall Life Cycle’ and the ‘Prototype Life Cycle’. These were analysed in a more in depth way in terms of the stages.

Week 8

The two learning outcomes within this lecture were based on;

  • Being able to understand the analysis and design of an information system
  • Understanding the relationship of an information system to a wider business context.

As mentioned in my previous blog, the ‘Waterfall Life Cycle’ is the basic lifecycle which breaks project down into stages which need to be completed and marked off before continuing to the next stage. I found out that the Feasibility Study seeks to answer three questions:

  1. Is the system technically feasible – will it work?
  2. Is the system financially justified – can we afford it?
  3. Is the system ethically acceptable – should we do it?

I was also told what should be included in the Feasibility Study / Report. It should outline the system that has been proposed, give a technical summary of the equipment and the software, it should also include a project plan and a cost-benefit analysis. We continued to go in depth with all the stages of ‘Waterfall Life Cycle’ and then moved on to doing the exact same for the ‘Prototype Life Cycle’.

We then proceeded onto doing a group exercise in which we were asked to organise a University graduation ceremony which was expected to take place at the Lowry centre in the summer. In small groups we had to identify 3 systems that would be beneficial in such an event and apply the principles of either the ‘Waterfall Life Cycle’ and the ‘Prototype Life Cycle’ stages to the systems chosen.

 

Week 9

The learning outcomes for this week are the exact same for the learning outcomes in the lecture held in the previous week. I learnt that the implementation of an information system consists of the following stages;

  • Project planning
  • Production or procurement of software/programming
  • Testing within the project team and with the users 
  • Implementation 
  • Maintenance of the system

‘Programme Evaluation and Review Technique’ (PERT) is one method that can be used to chart project activities, it uses “critical path analysis” evaluation and review techniques. We also talked about Gantt charts, which can be used to represent the project plan. It could be constructed from the PERT chart and can be used to show the allocation of resources and tract the progress against the plan.

After looking at various Gantt charts, we looked into ‘Testing’. This is defined as checking that the software works through the submission of test data and also checking that the results achieved meet the expectations. We looked into the various methods of testing which include;

  • Module testing
  • Link testing
  • Systems testing
  • Acceptance testing

There you have it! All of the things that I learnt briefly summarised for you all!

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Assessment 1 - Blog 3

By: David Tonge

Blog 3 – Due 23/04/2015

 

Hello, and welcome to my 3rd blog posting. This blog will discuss the topics covered in my lectures & seminars in weeks 8 & 9.

 

Week 8 – Lecture

 

My week 8 lecture discussed systems analysis and design. During the lecture, we learnt about the 2 main Systems Life Cycles that designers must consider using, when they are creating a system for a customer.

 

We were first taught about the Waterfall Life Cycle. This consists of 5 main stages. Firstly, a Feasibility Study is conducted “to determine if the project should get the go-ahead” (OpenPro, 2014), this is essential as if a project is not financially/technically necessary it would simply be a waste of money to conduct it.

 

Systems Analysis & Design is then conducted to finalise what exactly a user wants a new system to do, how it could work and what could be improved on the old system to accommodate these new requirements. A Requirements Specification is created – detailing everything relating to how the new system should look and function.

 

Programme & Unit Testing is then conducted to ensure that all parts of the system work properly and as intended.

 

Testing is done on every part of the system, every individual part of the system is collaborated and to ensure everything is in full working order.

 

Once the system has been technically checked, it is tested by project team – to check that every part of it works properly (a Systems test) and by members of staff at the company who required it – to ensure that it meets the organisation’s requirements.

 

When a business is pleased with the new system, it is implemented using 1 of 2 main methods (immediate implementation (de-activating the old system and activating the new one) or phased implementation (this is where parts of a new system are implemented one by one” (DeskTopClass, 2015))). I think that phased implementation is the better of these two methods as any problems that might arise can be resolved.

 

The system then needs to be regularly maintained, to ensure that no major problems have occurred and so any minor issues can be resolved.

We were also taught about the Prototype Lifecycle. This is similar to the Waterfall Lifecycle apart from the fact that a prototype is testing during the process, to see if it matches user(s)’ requirements, if it does not then programmers can go back and make small changes.
 

I believe that the Prototype Lifecycle is better for an organisation to use, due to the aforementioned fact. It is a longer and more expensive process to use, compared to the Waterfall Method, but any changes that arise can simply be introduces – rather than starting the entire process again.

 

Also, during the lecture in week 8, we were asked to critique a paper which was a business’ proposal for a new system for a client. We were asked to choose either the Waterfall Method or the Prototype Method, and see whether or not the business could afford it etc. and how the business could use our chosen model to formulate every part of the production.

 

Week 8 – Seminar

 

My Week 8 Seminar consisted of a recap of all the major elements needed to create my website for Assessment 2. This consisted of re-informing me the basics of CSS including how to add padding to a piece of text; how to customise the height and width of a box/image; how to customise fonts to my required colour, height etc.; how to customise the look of a Navigation Bar and how to essentially make my website look as I desire.

 

We were then encouraged to look for a website to re-make for our Practical Assessment, if we hadn’t done already, and to begin working on the formatting of our chosen website. I found this very helpful as any issues that we encountered whilst making our websites can be rectified with help from our seminar tutor.

 

Week 9 – Lecture

 

The lecture material in Week 9 covered the different stages and types of implementation. We were taught that implementation consists of 5 main stages – Project Planning (to aid the business ensure that a project is delivered on-time and on-budget); Programming (making the system to the client(s)’ specifications); Testing (ensuring that the new system works by entering a set of data & that the results meet required the clients(s)’ expectations; Implementation (physically installing the new system on at the business) & Maintenance (ensuring that the new system is still operational at a later date).

 

We also learnt about the 2 main project management tools, Gantt Charts and PERT Charts, these are used to “assess how long a project should take…and plan the order in which you’ll complete tasks” (Mind Tools, 2015). I think that creating a Gantt chart when creating a system is essential, as ensuring that a project is delivered on-time is essential to it’s success.

 

A group task was then assigned, we were asked to create a Gantt or PERT chart which would be used to plan a holiday. The Gantt chart would have to include all necessary stages (from researching a hotel to checking-in at the airport) and would have to include a reasonable timeframe, our group decided to plan a holiday to Barcelona.

 

Week 9 - Seminar

 

The Seminar in Week 9 helped me to further understand the functions and uses of HTML & CSS (including how to add padding to a piece of text or shape & how to fully creating a logo using only CSS). We were then asked to visit http://goo.gl/LnFN3V to see some examples of what can be done using CSS3.

 

We were then encourgaed to continue working on our websites for Assessment 2, possibly using some of the new CSS techniques we had learnt earlier in the lecture.

 

This seminar was very helpful as any aid needed during it could be easily attained by asking a seminar tutor for help.

 

Reference List

·         OpenPro. (2014). OPENPRO SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT LIFE CYCLE. Retrieved 22 April, 2015, from http://www.openpro.com/services_sdlc.html

·         DeskTopClass. (2015). Discuss Different Types Of Implementation Of A System. Retrieved 22 April, 2015, from http://www.desktopclass.com/education/computer-it/discuss-different-types-of-implementation-of-a-system.html

·         Mind Tools. (2015). Gantt Charts Planning and Scheduling Team Projects. Retrieved 23 April, 2015, from http://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newPPM_03.htm

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From Baking for a charity to a start up business

By: chevonne163

My name is Chevonne Smith and I am the youngest of four siblings, I seem to be the one that gets pulled in on the things on my mother’s to-do list. One of them was raising money for Macmillan cancer support in memory of my late granddad.

My granddad died before I was born so I only have the memories of what different family members tell me so I thought this would be a good idea to share the memories and how the charity of Macmillan cancer support helped them through their struggle. It was a great idea to get the family together and celebrate my granddad birthday which was the 1st August,we got together and sent out leaflets and images to get others involved with the Macmillan coffee morning.

Macmillan knows how a cancer diagnosis can affect everything. so when you have questions or need someone to turn to, they are there. Macmillan gives you support, energy and inspiration you need to take back control, so you can start to feel like yourself again. Because no one should face cancer alone.

Macmillan coffee morning pack with items to make cakes
Macmillan Coffee Morning pack with boxes

I feel that when you bake it should be done with love. Every cake should represent the hard work you put into it and when you take that first bite you can taste the joy of your own bake. Together with my mother we made a range of cakes to showcase our talents but also raise money for a charity close to my mother’s heart.

The event was a great success but don’t take my word for it we had people asking for cakes but at the time we was just thinking about it as a one-off event we might do next year and that is what we told them. “Hope to see you next year for the Macmillan Coffee Morning :-).”

Coffee Morning table with homemade cakes
Homemade cakes made for the Macmillan Coffee Morning

A few months down the line it got my mum thinking what if she did have a cake business it could be a success, I tried to stay out of it but as being youngest, living at home and doing assignments that could help my mother it was a big no-no. then it got me thinking about the future and my dream to one day start a family business of some sort, may come true. I could help my mother step by step with the skills that I have and will gain in the future though courses in business management and positions in customer services moving her business in to a building selling her cakes and hot beverages.

I challenge you to bake a cake to share with loved ones and see what they say

Post it on twitter or Facebook and tag us in it #cakeybitsandbobs

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Blog 3

By: syedhussain

Blog 3-Principles of system developments lectures week 8 and 9 

 

Within this blog I would be explaining about what I have learnt during the principles of systems development lectures which had taken place in week 8 and 9. 

 

Week 8  

 

Within week 8 there were two learning outcomes which the lecture was based on which were being able to understand the analysis and design of an information system and understanding the relationship of an information system to the wider business context. To begin with we had gone through the key system elements on where the developer or project team must be aware of what the requirements and design of how the system is to be implemented. After we had discussed the key system elements we had to take part in a group task where we had a case study to go through and using the 2 system development models which we briefly had gone through last week. We had to consider the advantages and disadvantages of each model if they were applied to the case. After going through the case study we had  discussed in more detail and considered the practical aspects of the each stage within both the system development lifecycles which were waterfall cycle and prototype cycle. Towards the end of the lecture we had another group task where we were given a scenario where we had to consider what systems would be required and use the principles of either waterfall or prototype stages to the systems we had chose. 

 

Week 9 

 

Within the lecture which had taken place in week 9 the lecture was focused on considering the importance of the final systems stage which is implementation.'Implementation is the process of executing a plan or policy so that a concept becomes a reality'(Gustafson). The stages which are vital when considering implementation:  

  • Project planning  

  • Programming 

  • Testing  

  • Implementation 

  • Maintenance  

Project planning is where the information has to meet the requirements. The projects team objective should be to deliver the system on time, within budget and acceptable quality. The project manager must plan the project and monitor the progress against the plan. Then we discussed the charting activities which were Programme Evaluation and Review Technique(PERT) this type of chart is used to identify the critical paths were activities that have no float time should be given priority and minimum elapse time. The second type of chart is Gantt chart  this can be considered as the project plan, it shows the allocation of resources to each activity and track the progress of the task. Once the timing has been considered from using the project planning then next stages can be completed however must consider the time which has been allocated using either Gantt chart or PERT.  

 

References:  

 

For further reading I would recommend: 

-Whiteley D.(2013)  An introduction to Information Systems 

-Boddy, D., Boonstra,A., Kennedy, G. (2009) Information systems and organizations Chapter 1 

  

 

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